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Iran: Internet Blocking Threatens Digital Economy

The regime in Iran is reacting harshly to popular protests following the death of a woman in the custody of the country’s Islamic morality police. This is not only problematic from a human rights perspective, but increasingly poses an economic problem as well.

The Background

Twenty-two-year-old Masha Amini died after being arrested by the country’s Islamic morality police. She was arrested because her clothing did not comply with the strict regulations in the country. What happened to her in custody is not known. All that is known is that she fell into a coma and died on September 16. This was followed by ongoing protests in the country, directed not only against police violence but also against the strict religious regulations regarding private living. Since the overthrow of the constitutional monarchy in 1979, the country has been ruled as an Islamic republic with Islam as the state religion by a religious leader and a religious council of guardians.

Although the morality police reject the use of violence, protests in the country are responded to with harshness. According to activists, 83 people have died so far in the course of police operations against the protests. A state-controlled news agency, on the other hand, has reported 60 deaths so far. In addition, numerous protesters have been arrested. The government has also responded with wide-ranging Internet blocks aimed at making networking among protesters more difficult.

Rising unemployment feared

The national community of online businesses in Iran has pointed out in connection with the interblocks that the government’s measures pose an economic threat to many businesses and individuals. Specifically, there was talk of 400,000 companies and one million jobs being threatened. People who worked independently from home were particularly affected. Since all essential online services were blocked, work could not be continued, which meant the loss of income. The blocking of Instagram and WhatsApp in particular stand out, as these platforms are essential for online commerce in Iran. The association’s notice, which was posted on Instagram, has since been removed.

Meanwhile, Communications Minister Issa Zarepour has hinted that the blocks on the two aforementioned services could remain in place permanently. The regime had already shown interest in blocking Instagram in the country in the past.

Simon Lüthje

I am co-founder of this blog and am very interested in everything that has to do with technology, but I also like to play games. I was born in Hamburg, but now I live in Bad Segeberg.

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The regime in Iran is reacting harshly to popular protests following the death of a woman in the custody of the country’s Islamic morality police. This is not only problematic from a human rights perspective, but increasingly poses an economic problem as well. The Background Twenty-two-year-old Masha Amini died after being arrested by the country’s … (Weiterlesen...)

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